BREED DESCRIPTION & INFORMATION

Norwich Terrier
Can Ch. Hoodoo Wizard of the Wild Witches
Photos courtesy of Amblegreen

Breed Registries:


Note: The breed registries indicated above are the most recognized all-breed registries. The breed may also be recognized by other registries not indicated here. For further details about dog registries, please see the document: Dog Breed Registries in North America.

* — The FCI is the World Canine Organization, which includes 84 members and contract partners (one member per country) that each issue their own pedigrees and train their own judges. The FCI recognizes 339 breeds, with each being the "property" of a specific country. The "owner" countries of the breeds write the standards of these breeds in co-operation with the Standards and Scientific Commissions of the FCI, and the translation and updating are carried out by the FCI. The FCI is not a breed registry nor does it issue pedigrees.


Origin:

Great Britain

Height:

Should not exceed 10 inches (25 cm) at the withers

Weight:

Approximately 11 lbs (5 kgs) (in proportion to the dog's structure and balance)

Breed Profile:

The Norwich Terrier is believed to have been developed from crossing small Irish Terriers with other short-legged Terrier breeds. He is a fearless little dog with an endearing personality and a fine watchdog that will announce the presence of strangers. He is a hardy, easy going, and very active little dog. Loyal, affectionate, and adaptable — he makes an ideal companion.

The Norwich is one of the smallest working terriers. He is sturdy, stocky and has distinctive prick ears and a slightly foxy expression. His coat, which can be all shades of red, wheaten, black and tan, or grizzle, is hard, wiry and straight, lying close to the body.

For several years, two varieties of ear types — the drop and prick — were shown together and inter-bred as the Norwich Terrier. However, when interbreeding created problems with ear carriage, breeders discontinued this practice. After a few generations of breeding only like ear types together, it became evident that two different types of terriers were evolving. In 1963 separate breed standards for the two varieties were submitted to The Kennel Club (England) and two years later, separate breed status was granted. The newly recognized breed with the drop-ears became known as the Norfolk Terrier. Following Britain's example, the Canadian Kennel Club recognized the Norfolk Terrier as a separate breed in 1977.

Health Issues

If you are considering the adoption of a Norwich Terrier puppy, or any breed, it is very important to be selective in choosing a responsible and reputable breeder. Ensure that the prospective puppy's parents have all health clearances. Breeding of any dog should not be done until after they have been proven to be free of evidence of significant hereditary diseases. (For more information on selecting a breeder, see the articles on the main Breed Listing and Breeders page.)

Additional Health Resources:

Only Natural Pet Store

Breed Standards

AKC NORWICH TERRIER DVD
15 Min. Video Edition, Published by the AKC
Discussion of the breed standard: good structure and movement, acceptable colors, correct head, size. Developed for breeders, exhibitors and judges.
— Available from Dogwise.com

Grooming Information

  • Grooming — This section of the Canada's Guide to Dogs website includes tips, articles and information covering all aspects of dog grooming along with a listing of Groomers from across Canada.

Training Resources

  • Training — For training information, see this growing section of the Canada's Guide to Dogs website for tips, articles, as well as listings of training centres across Canada.

Training Tools & Equipment
Choose from a wide variety of items from Dogwise.com



Additional Information

  • Clubs, Sports & Activities — For information on the many sports and activities you can get involved in with your dog.
  • Working Dogs — The Working Dogs section of the Canada's Guide to Dogs website provides information and listings of organizations that are involved in various dog jobs, such as Guide Dogs, Therapy Dogs, Police Dogs, Protection Dogs, and much more.

Select from the following links to view Breeder listings; Breed Clubs; Rescue Organizations; as well as Books and other Merchandise specific to the breed:

Breeders  /  Breed Clubs  /  Rescues  /  Books & More